maddehhey:

Probably the greatest thing that has happened at the Hong Kong protests. 

best occupy central tweets i’ve seen so far 

(Source: shaniabery)

tobogganable:

Amazing things happening in HK. 

→ The Umbrella Revolution: Why Hong Kong is so special.

adricthemindnimon:

Protesters in Hong Kong have really come together in some truly amazing ways.

  • Protesters have been picking up trash, cleaning the streets, and even sorting recycling so as to not leave a mess.
  • There has been only one incident of vandalism that I am aware of, and protesters responded with a…

theenergyissue:

Hong Kong’s “Cubicle Dwellers”: Exposing Life in One of the World’s Most Densely Packed Cities

In light of the current political protests in Hong Kong, showcasing a project from the Hong Kong-based Society for Community Organization (SoCO), a non-governmental and human rights advocacy group, seems fitting. SoCO has organized community social actions and civic education programs to encourage political participation since 1972, and it recently brought attention to the unacceptable living conditions of many of the city’s poorer inhabitants in a disturbingly illuminating ad campaign. “Cubicle Dwellers” shows the tiny apartments, averaging only about 40 square feet and too small to be shot from anywhere but above, that over 100,000 people occupy. In these spaces, individuals and families must rest, cook, and store all their personal belongings. Due to Hong Kong’s lack of buildable space, the city has come to be one of the world’s densest, resulting in increasingly tall, tightly-packed dwellings. Indeed, thirty-six of the world’s 100 tallest residential buildings are in Hong Kong, and more people live or work above the 14th floor than anywhere else on Earth, making it the world’s most vertical city. The project highlights how the disparity between industrial growth and human needs can rapidly transform environments, and how an imbalance in the way we distribute our energy resources can paradoxically create places of enormous wealth and widespread poverty. 

(Source: adsoftheworld.com)

cubebreaker:

New York-based artist Kim Keever drops paint into water-filled aquariums to create unpredictable abstract displays of color and form.

(via bubbletealolita)